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[This is kluge.]Where some ideas are stranger than others...

RANDOM SITE ARCHIVE at the Moonspeaker

PREVIOUS RANDOM SITES OF THE WEEK

  • Liberation Collective (2017-04-16) : Collective blog of six Radical Feminist thinkers who, "hope to provide an online space for radical feminist commentary around issues of interest to our community." Besides the six principle writers, who hold and express diverse views, they welcome guest writers. Posts are generally lengthy and carefully written with good footnotes, and the comment moderation is judicious.
  • Judy Grahn (2017-04-09) : A well-known poet and activist, this site effectively serves as a lightly annotated catalogue of Grahn's books and recordings, and occasionally purchasing information. There are some curious omissions, such as The Highest Apple, a valuable though flawed study of lesbian poetry, so it is worth checking the online catalogues of second hand bookstores as well as your local library for more of her work.
  • Language - A Feminist Guide (2017-04-02) : The personal blog of linguist Deborah Cameron, whose published books include Feminism and Linguistic Theory, which is not nearly so dry to read as its title may suggest. Her blog is accessible to general readers, and deals mostly with english from multiple angles, including movie reviews, deconstructions of various types of linguistic pedantry, and reflections on current events.
  • Women's Health in Women's Hands (2017-03-27) : Central website of the ongoing work of the women's health specialists led by Carol Downer. Currently the women taking part in the project are located in northern california. The site itself provides basic information on the female reproductive system, including clear diagrams and descriptions and a list of books visitors may purchase. There is a great deal more to women's health than taking care of their reproductive organs of course, but in this time of resurgent hostility to women managing their own fertility and reproductive health, its relevance is critical.
  • Tradfem Collective de traduction de textes féministes radicaux (2017-03-20) : A collective of translators working to make Radical Feminist essays and books available in languages besides english. So far the majority of works have been translated into french and german, starting with a selection of articles by Andrea Dworkin. New translations are posted each week.
  • Open Access Directory (2017-03-13) : The site description declares that the OAD is "a compendium of simple factual lists about OA to science and scholarship, maintained by the OA community at large." This is true, but it is also an excellent place to start if you are looking for a clear explanation of what "open access" means and some examples of different approaches to implementing it. Start here for some great mythbusting about how many approaches to OA there are for example. The Directory of Open Access Journals and the Directory of Open Access Books are independent projects from this one.
  • Le Blog de Christine Delphy (2017-03-06) : Distinguished Feminist theorist and scholar Christine Delphy posts articles in both french and english, taking a firmly intersectional perspective. She is often most cited for her work on the journal "Nouvelles Questions Féministes," and her 1982 book Close to Home: A Materialist Analysis of Women's Oppression, but she has many more recent works, from Familiar Explotation: A New Analysis of Marriage in Contemporary Western Societies to Separate and Dominate: Feminism and Racism After the War On Terror.
  • Middle English Dictionary (2017-02-26) : A useful online source provided by the University of Michigan, comprising 15 000 pages of entries digitized into a database that can be searched by word or quotation. The site is not as visually busy as other electronic dictionaries, and it is impressively fast. A small drawback of using it is that it does not provide links to related resources at UMichigan or elsewhere.
  • Working Class Movement Library (2017-02-19) : A major archive of over 200 years of records of organizing and campaigning by working class women and men primarily in england. It started out, as many archives that don't follow a mainstream topic do, as a personal collection collected and maintained by Ruth and Edmond Frow. They have a range of ongoing projects, including oral histories, a lecture series, and linking together otherwise hard to access collections. It has few digitally available materials, but a helpful photocopying and scanning service.
  • Indian and Cowboy Podcast Network (2017-02-19) : A listener-supported Indigenous podcast network founded by Ryan McMahon in October 2014. All of the podcasts are excellent, and as unafraid of taking up difficult political and social questions as they are of making the listener laugh. Among them is the already featured here Métis in Space, Red Man Laughing, and The Henceforward.
  • The Victorian Web (2017-02-12) : A remarkable site that precedes the world wide web, organized with an emphasis on links rather than searching. So this means that the huge collection of images, papers, and books is extensively cross-referenced. Articles are not written from the faux neutral standpoint endemic to encyclopedias, so it is possible to find multiple viewpoints on the same item with full evidence and original research.
  • TheOneRing.net (2017-02-05) : Still going after its original founding in 1999 not long after Peter Jackson revealed there would be movie versions of Lord of the Rings at long last, TheOneRing.net also remains a fairly busy place. There are many original essays and an astonishing archive of original art, and often the best place to start is not the main page due to the many (inevitable) product announcements, but the Library.
  • Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2017-01-29) : Founded in 1995, this open access "dynamic reference work" is a distant cousin of Wikipedia in that it is continuously being added to and edited. Unlike Wikipedia, this work is carried out by recognized experts in the field under the guidance of an editorial team. The effort to expand beyond european and american male philosophers is ongoing.
  • Marxist Internet Archive (2017-01-22) : A non-profit, volunteer-run website providing access to a major collection of marxist and marxist-relevant works. The materials are provided mainly in pdf format, although the number of doc, epub, and audio versions is growing all the time. The combination of primarily pdf versions and a clear citation policy makes this archive especially scholar friendly.
  • Fordham University Internet History Sourcebooks Project (2017-01-15) : A well-organized and formatted archive of public domain and what the webmasters refer to as "copy permitted" historical texts. The team has been making a concerted effort to go beyond europe and the usual suspects, including themed sections for women's and science history, as well as a start on including materials from the rest of the world.
  • OpenCulture.com (2017-01-08) : Founded in 2006 to catalogue and describe the burgeoning range of free educational materials on-line, OpenCulture may have started by cataloguing massive on-line courses, but has gone on to index podcasts, free textbooks, and annotated links to numerous library and museum collections.
  • Jedisabre.com eBooks Tutorial (2017-01-01) : One thing that is coming soon to the Moonspeaker is ebooks, because I think they're cool and think this is a far more sensible way to make things available offline than a shitty app. They are actually quite simple to make, and this is the tutorial that tells you everything you need to know to make your own.
  • RadFemArchive (2016-11-26) : One of the great frustrations for Radical Feminists and those who would like to learn more about their theory and politics whether or not they agree with them, is the difficulty of keeping Feminist works generally in print. The RadFemArchive makes electronic copies of out of print texts available for free and beyond the confines of university libraries, an important service.
  • Roads Were Not Built For Cars (2016-11-19) : Companion website of an early crowd-funded book by Carlton Reid, which goes through the actual history of the paved roads so many drivers treat as solely their own entitlement. An excellent companion paper to read with the site or book is Whose Roads? by Todd Litman of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute.
  • OpenMedia (2016-11-12) : A respected Canadian non-profit organization founded in 2008 that works on preventing the internet from becoming a mass censorship and surveillance service controlled by corporate interests. It has an excellent blog and carries out important research as well.
  • idlewords.com (2016-10-19) : Maciej Cegłowski, proprietor of Pinboard's writing home online. Its tagline is "brevity is for the weak" and he lives up to the letter by providing excellent long read pieces on topics ranging from travel to technology issues. He also maintains an archive of his talks, which for some reason is not linked to directly on the main page, possibly because his current tag cloud has lost track of it. Nevertheless, don't miss them, they are as erudite, accessible, and often hilarious as his long blog posts.
  • LibraryBox (2016-10-08) : A low powered web server that can be used to provide remote access to files where access to the internet is for some reason difficult, as well as to set up a local mesh net of interconnected boxen for a small area. This is a free software project, so you can buy one or build your own because the software and recommended hardware specs are provided right from the LibraryBox website.
  • Quintillian's Institutes of Oratory (2016-09-18) : This is an excellent on-line edition of Quintillian's famous text for teachers of rich roman boys with political aspirations. It is in fact still relevant today, not least because the basic oration structure he describes is still how we are taught to write essays.
  • Schneier on Security (2016-09-07) : If you'd like to read a mainly level-headed, practical perspective on security for your computer, on-line, and more widely in life, Bruce Schneier's site is a great place to start. I highly recommend reading his post on Choosing Secure Passwords to start.
  • Moonhawk's Pages (2016-09-01) : Linguist Dan Moonhawk Alford's website kept online after his passing by his good friend Don Watson. More than worth the to read his discussion of the Whorf hypothesis and the key twin papers God is Not a Noun in Native America and God is a Verb. The former was cited by John Mohawk, Seneca philosopher and late editor of Akwesasne Notes, which is no small endorsement.
  • RAFT Alliance (2016-08-25) : Prior to europeans arriving in the americas, the level of diversity in plant and animal species was far greater. A fundamental purpose behind all the effort Indigenous people put into developing so many varieties and diverse relationships with the land was to avoid starving, whatever happened with the weather. The RAFT Alliance is an organization endeavouring to restore those systems, with an ever greater urgency in this, so far one of the hottest years on record ever seen.
  • Hyperbole User Manual (2016-08-17) : If you are not a fan of emacs you may not find yourself using this program, but it follows through on interesting premise by effectively allowing an emacs user to treat their computer as if it were a part of the internet, navigating it via links in the form of buttons and performing other tasks. If nothing else, it is a nice demonstration of another approach to creating an interface for a person to make use of their comupter.
  • Bev Jo - Radical Feminist Writing (2016-08-10) : This blog is just what it says, and includes the wonderful on-line, updated edition of "Dykes-Loving-Dykes: Separatist Politics" which she and her coauthors originally published in 1990.
  • Redstockings (2016-07-31) : A Volunteer-run and curated archive of documents, photos, and other historical materials from the Women's Liberation Movement, especially in the 1960s and 1970s. This is another contribution to the critical necessity for women to create and maintain their own historical documents.
  • Guide to DRM-Free Living (2016-07-05) : Whatever your position on DRM, if you are on a budget or looking for convenient links to free ebooks, music, video, and a range of tools to make your own, this guide is an excellent starting point. If you've never looked into these sources before, you're going to be pleasantly surprised.
  • Métis in Space (2016-06-26) : I briefly mentioned this podcast awhile back. It is the ever awesome place you can hear Molly and Chelsea "hilariously deconstruct the science fiction genre through a decolonial lens." They're not kidding, and they check out everything from the obscure and B-Movie to the familiar standards.
  • Bret Victor, Beast of Burden (2016-06-07) : Victor's sense of humour is quirky, and his area of expertise is interface design, that is how tools are made usable by humans and useful for their purpose. His ideas are challenging and reflect a fundamental and responsible belief in a better future, especially by "Reforming our infantilized society."
  • The Anarchist Library (2016-05-27) : Recently I was tracking down a reference in Fields, Factories, and Workshops by Petr Kropotkin, which led me to this site. It includes a growing collection of works in a range of open formats, from XeLaTeX to ePub, and to my knowledge is the only place on-line so far outside of possibly the Wayback Machine that includes all of Kropotkin's works.
  • âpihtawikosisân (2016-05-20) : As she says herself, this is the blog of a Plains Cree speaking, Métis woman from alberta currently living in montréal, writing acutely on Indigenous history, the white problem, Indigenous legal developments, and potential futures. Chelsea is also one half of the awesome team behind the podcast Métis in Space.
  • activehistory.ca (2016-05-09) : Another great blog for historians, both budding and established. It has some similarities in approach to Savage Minds, covering interesting topics, research projects, and pedagogical questions, all while resisting jargon and mystification.
  • The Programming Historian (2016-03-31) : Central repository of tutorials for humanities majors in how to perform automated document and database analysis, as well as mapping and digital presentation of research results. Everything is open source and peer reviewed, although the project team appears to be struggling to find a balance between a desire to review and edit to perfection and posting new materials.
  • Starship Reckless (2016-03-24) : Molecular biologist and SF writer Athena Andreadis' blog. Compulsively readable, chockablock with science, literature, and a complete lack of genre snobbery that is all too rare. If you don't want to start at most recent, I recommend the Andreadis Unibrow Theory of Art.
  • Public Library of Science (2016-02-29) : One of several key projects to ensure publicly funded research is made freely available, PLOS includes a range of peer-reviewed journals with all papers released under a Creative Commons Attribution license. It happens to be mainly biologically oriented, but there are other important philosophically related projects including arXiv.org.
  • 2D Goggles - Dangerous Experiments in Comics (2016-02-22) : This subsite is updated intermittently because Syndey Padua is an extremely busy animator and now semi-globetrotting graphic novel author. Her work is well worth perusing, and if you can't wait for updates to this site, pop over to her main site to see some of her other projects. She is also an impressive amateur historian, have a look at her suggested readings.
  • Ancient Lives Project (2016-02-15) : Where to go to contribute to the crowd sourced transcription of the Oxyrhynchus papyri. You can identify letters (no need to be able to read greek) or even just measure the scanned papyri fragments. So far at least 100 texts have been published from this project, including fragments of ancient plays, gospels, and philosophical texts.
  • The Paypom Treaty (2016-02-09) : The Grand Council of Treaty 3 has posted a pdf of the notes made for Chief Powasson in 1873, when the Lake of the Woods Ojibway were signing a treaty with the crown in right of canada. There are notes of this type for many treaties in canada, all remarkable for the differences recorded between what was said and what was written.
  • Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture (2016-02-04) : A remarkable archive of publications, oral history transcripts, photographs, language resources, and much more. It is provided by the Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research, which has been pursuing a long term digitization and cataloguing project that also notes other important Métis resources across the web.
  • Project Vox (2016-01-13) : Home of a project working to bring the writings of early modern women philosophers back into print or even into print for the first time digitally and in hard copy. Some of these women have other works that have remained fairly available, usually because they were deemed "gender appropriate," but in the main these works have been ignored purely because of the sex of the writer.
  • Intersex Roadshow (2015-12-31) : Thanks to Bitch Media, I stumbled on this all too infrequently updated blog, in particular the Intersex Genitalia Illustrated and Explained post. Cary Costello's explanations and illustrations are excellent and respectful, a combination that can be all too hard to find as soon as the topic of genitalia and their not so binary-ness comes up. The comments are actually useful, simply skip over the inevitable pile of recent spam.
  • The Original Hacker's Dictionary (2015-12-27) : The Hacker's Dictionary, better known to some of us by its earlier name the Jargon File, is a subject of continuing low level religious wars, in the computer programmer sense. This page reproduces a 1988 era version, and it is well worth having a look, especially by comparison with the controversial branch still maintained by Eric Raymond, but be ready for distracting html code errors when you consult the latter.
  • Christi Belcourt (2015-12-22) : One of the Métis Nation's great artists, from Manitou Sakhigan, Alberta. Her works range from paintings to stained glass, prints, birch bark canoes, and her part in the amazing Onaman Collective. I can't possibly do justice to her art with words, the best thing is to see it for yourself.
  • The Missing CDs (2015-12-18) : The "missing manual" series published by O'Reilley has become something of a juggernaut, successfully displacing practically every other series directed to the same audience with "idiot" or "dummies" in their titles. This companion site is where the various code snippets and sample files from the books can be downloaded from, as well as the occasional program. The site includes a significant amount of material from earlier editions, a great help to anyone who must use an older version of the given missing manual's subject.
  • Indigenous Knowledge Commons (2015-12-07) : An excellent source of on-line courses, bibliographical information, and digital publications of all kinds. There are tools and digital publication options for scholars and students, including readers in specific topics. It also has a clear and easily accessible protocols and permissions page.
  • Suzette Haden Elgin's Verbal Self Defense Home Page (2015-10-30) : Unfortunately I have no idea how long this site will stay up, because Suzette Haden Elgin passed away after a long illness in January of this year. She was a true and wonderful Feminist pioneer, who believed firmly that we all have the capacity to manage the power of language to better our lives. To see her sci-fi works, have a look at her homepage at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.
  • Strange Horizons (2015-10-10) : A decent on-line magazine of "speculative fiction" — a term which I think has settled down into being an umbrella monicker for fantasy and sci-fi works, even though there is plenty of disagreement about that since there is less a boundary than a gradient between the two. The magazine includes a fine body of work including both original stories and non-fiction articles, and it is a volunteer-run effort well worth supporting.
  • The Work of Edward Tufte and Graphics Press (2015-09-30) : If you have read Robert Bringhurst on typographic style or gotten entangled with LaTeX, it is likely you have encountered references to the excellent work of Edward Tufte. In a nutshell, his books and his website are all about how to present information visually in an honest, effective, and beautiful way.
  • The Library of Babel (2015-06-10) : A fascinating realisation of Jorge Borges' famous story. It is accessible both with and without javascript, and if you wish you can even download the books. The ancillary essays are an excellent read in their own right, don't miss them! In a way, this may be the closest to an internet one-time pad cipher, though of course it really isn't anything of the sort.
  • The Elements of Typographic Style Applied to the Web (2015-05-30) : For all the folks out there who are interested in typography in general, Robert Bringhurst's book on the subject is an incredible read. He did not consider web typography though, and so Richard Rutter began the project of translating Bringhurst's principles to the on-line medium. The project isn't quite done, and is open to other contributors.
  • The De Vere Society (2015-05-23) : Whether or not you have ever had a strong opinion about who the author of the works of Shakespeare is, this site is well worth browsing. The articles are clear and respectfully written, always a refreshing thing to see when it comes to controversial topics, with excellent, non-ecumenical bibliographies. For information on the Shakespeare oeuvre itself, my go to source these days is Open Source Shakespeare.
  • The Turing Digital Archive (2015-05-16) : A partial collection of scanned documents from Alan Turing's papers including articles (both published and unpublished), letters, and photographs. Unfortunately the image viewer is flash-dependent, a peculiar decision likely related to the attempt to prevent the downloading and reuse of the materials.
  • An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments (2015-05-09) : A wonderful and hilarious little book that is well worth purchasing for regular rereading. Ali Almossawi's combination of illustrations and just enough text is still rarely applied to trickier topics like sorting out solid reasoning from what is at best only a facsimile of it.
  • The Big Bang Never Happened.org (2015-04-03)  Eric J. Lerner's site covering additional information related to his 1991 book of the same name. Well worth a read, as is the book itself, regardless of your position, if any on the question of whether the big bang theory is a valid description of the origins of the universe. Lerner's argument is not mainstream, nor is it on the extreme edges of physics, and he may simply have been ahead of the curve.
  • The Long Way Home (2015-03-22)  An excellent blog providing thoughtful explorations of racism, sexism and homophobia in speculative fiction including many helpful links. Alas Ardhra has not been posting much lately, but she is keeping her blog up, which is a wonderful service. To start, have a read of What is Cultural Appropriation? which honestly I can't recommend highly enough for clarity and completeness.
  • Iain McGilchrist's Website (2015-03-06) : If you have not read McGilchrist's The Master and his Emissary or at least watched his animated RSA talk, then do watch the latter right away, and then at least read the introduction to the book on his website. To my mind, his book is the true follow up to Hofstadter's Gödel, Escher, Bach and even provides insight into why Hofstatder himself has never been able to follow up on it.
  • Internet Archive (2015-02-16) : Long overdue for a moment in the Random Sites spotlight, older denizens of the internet will know this site by its older name, the Wayback Machine. It has developed from a webpage archiving project into a non-profit organization archiving books, video games, sounds and much, much more, often under creative commons licenses or out of copyright.
  • Feminist Reprise Library (2015-02-09) : A site providing access to hard to get papers and excerpts from various feminist authors, especially lesbian feminists whose works are all too often out of print. The person who created and maintains the site provides very little information apart from the articles themselves, and it is mercifully devoid of the social media tags that proliferate like a bad rash on so many sites these days.
  • ΑΟΙΔΙΟ.org (2015-02-02) : This site may be officially on hiatus, but that doesn't change the value of the Annis' carefully curated series of ancient greek dialect descriptions and an excellent introduction to ancient greek metre. He also provides several annotated texts and a number of articles of his own on various greek poetry related topics.
  • Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (2015-01-26) : There are many programs out there to carry out page layout and typesetting. For speed, ease of set up and quality of results though, one of the best free packages out there is TeX. It is cross-platform, based on a document mark up approach analogous to html, it's free, and so good more presses and journals are adopting it all the time.
  • A Celebration of Women Writers (2015-01-19) : A wonderful site built and maintained by Mary Mark Ockerbloom that brings together at least hundreds of out of copyright or reproduced by permission books written by women. The range of authors and topics is spectacular, and the formatting minimal and careful. The result is highly readable texts on almost any screen.
  • Perseus Project at UChicago (2015-01-12) : It has come to my attention that the main Perseus Project site at Tufts is having some difficulties with its parser at the moment. An excellent alternative until the folks at Tufts have that sorted out is Perseus at Chicago. The only tweak you may need is to tell your web browser to override the site's font choices if you are working with Greek for ease of reading.
  • Brain Pickings (2015-01-05) : Maria Popova's wonderful site full of musings and annotated readings of books, mostly older texts that don't always get their due, and wondrous out-of-print gems that might never be seen but for her work, like the one linked here, The Green Beads.
  • London Review of Books - Translating Lorem Ipsum (2014-03-27) : Admittedly this isn't so much a random site as an addition to the "lorem ipsum" thread on this site. This article also appears, barely rewritten at the Guardian. In this original version, skip down to the second indented block if you are already familiar with lorem ipsum text.
  • Satimage - Smile (2014-02-05) : If you are on MacOSX, despite Apple's recent development of an allergy to its own scripting language, Applescript is still a premiere tool for automating tasks. Satimage is a French company, and they have a nice collection of osaxen and the like for download which are quite useful.
  • Paper For Fountain Pens (2014-01-26) : I have been on a quest for a notebook with paper reminiscent of a "blank bible" for some years, and while I have found something close but small at Manufactum (13cm x 10cm), these guys may actually have it. In addition, Inkophile confirms that the paper is fountain pen friendly.
  • CSS Tutorials at YourHTMLSource (2014-01-20) : This has been one of my standard reference sites for up-to-date CSS basics for literally years. Ross Shannon's explanations are clear, concise, and full of code snippets for trying out.
  • Ubuntu Manual Project (2014-01-12) : My *NIX chops have gotten a bit rusty despite the fact MacOSX is part of that family now, so I set up a dual boot into Ubuntu to get back up to speed. Then I found myself needing a decent introduction to the Unity interface (let's just say my feelings about it are mixed) and the best one I've found is provided by this open source manual project.
  • Latinitas Viva (2014-01-10) : Following on the Graeco-Roman theme of the previous featured site, let's move on to a more multi-media oriented approach. On Latinitas Viva you can listen to newscasts and various samples of ancient Latin text, a huge help for picking up where the accents go without literally checking syllable lengths.
  • The Perseus Project (2013-12-29) : If you work with ancient languages, are learning ancient languages, or are just plain curious, Perseus is the site you want. Graeco-Roman texts are at its core, but there are also many searchable texts in english including translations and ancillary works.
  • Open Source Shakespeare (2013-12-09) : One of the best websites for all your Shakespeare needs on the web. All the plays, all the sonnets, and looks like all the long form poems skinned with a thorough search engine and glossary of terms. The developer even has a concordance in there, which is pretty impressive.
  • Aamer Rahman (Fear of a Brown Planet) - Reverse Racism (2013-11-26) : This isn't a true random site, but Aamer Rahman's thorough deconstruction of supposed "reverse racism" is too brilliant not to feature it here. It is hysterical, it is awesome. This video was brought to my attention by the friendly folks at Boing Boing.
  • International Standard Paper Sizes (2013-11-26) : Yes, this link is pure geek. However, it is becoming relevant to more than just grad students and academics in general. More and more north american businesses are running into issues because of the retrograde paper sizes here that make it sheer shrieking misery to enlarge or reduce drawings, among other things.
  • ViHart.com (2013-11-18) : Here is a snazzy site; Vi Hart makes fascinating videos, usually on mathematical topics. Her explanation of logarithms is brilliant, making a far better analogy than I have ever seen before to make them more transparent.
  • DoctorWhoScarf.com (2013-11-12) : There are few Doctor Who costume items quite as iconic as the various scarves worn by the 4th Doctor, played by Tom Baker. If you'd like to know more about them, right down to how to knit one or more of them, this site is just what the Doctor ordered.
  • The Frankenstein Notebooks at the Shelley-Godwin Archive (2013-11-04) : Tell-tale as it is that this archive is named only for the men associated with Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, it remains well worth having a look at the earlier drafts of her famous novel. Her writing style is tighter and less florid than her husband's.
  • British Library Digitized Manuscripts (2013-10-29) : In a decision that should warm any scholar's heart, the British Library has been digitising its manuscript collection, a collection including materials from the ninth century. One of the easiest starting points for non-scholars is Arundel MS 263, one of Leonardo Da Vinci's notebooks. The scans are excellent, well-lit with high dpi, allowing lots of zoom to examine details.
  • Beyond Victoriana (2013-10-23) : Continuing on the Steampunk theme, now let's consider a more literary and political side of the genre. I really can't describe the site better than Ay-Leen the Peacemaker herself, "[a] blog about multicultural steampunk and retro-futurism — that is, steampunk outside of a Western-dominant, Eurocentric framework."
  • The Steampunk Workshop (2013-10-15) : Suppose you have a love of the steampunk aesthetic and the maker philosophy that is tied to it, let alone the genre of stories subsumed under the label. And let's suppose that somehow you haven't yet found your way to Jake Von Slatt's website of awesome projects ranging from mods to complete builds — well now you've got the link to rectify that situation!
  • Creative Commons (2013-10-11) : If you've seen one of the variants on this logo, , then chances are you've just encountered a CC-licensed work. Creative Commons is a non-profit organization working for better copyright law.
  • No Tech Magazine (2013-10-07) : like Low Tech Magazine a site that covers the sorts of technology that really, we are encouraged to overlook. "No Tech" is a tongue-in-cheek sort of name too, because the articles posted to the blog are all about technology, the kind that begins from coming up with an efficient way to solve a problem as opposed to coming up with something clever and trying to find a problem for it to solve.
  • WolframMathWorld (2013-10-03) : an impressive on-line mathematical encyclopedia that is updated daily. It is an interesting example of an alterante model of internet encyclopedia creation from a wiki; this site has a primary curator with one assistant who vets and prepares the entries.
  • The Book Arts Web (2013-09-17) : A great site for anyone interested in bookbinding and book art, it may also be referred to as "Philobiblon" from their domain name. Among the great resources they provide is access to issues of The Bonefolder and a central place for book-binding and reuse projects.
  • AlanTuring.net (2013-09-12) : The go to site for information on Alan Turing's contributions to modern computing, as well as introductions to the corrected history of computers, codebreaking, and artificial intelligence. It is maintained by Jack Copeland, who also contributed to the excellent anthology Colossus: The Secrets Of Bletchley Park's Codebreaking Computers.
  • Douglas R. Hofstadter (2013-09-05) : If you've ever read Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, this site is well worth a visit. It's oddly retro look opens into an interesting selection of material ranging from book excerpts to art to otherwise unpublished essays. Don't click on "Archives" though — that actually takes you off of his page. (Yes, technically it is a page, but it has enough material to make it at least a small site.)
  • The Edward Gorey House (2013-09-01) : Edward Gorey is one of my favourite authors, whom I originally discovered because of his unforgettable illustrations in a book by John Bellairs, The House With A Clock In Its Walls.
  • Contemporary Home Computing (2013-08-15) : Olia Lialina's extended essays on computing, web graphics, and neat conceptualizations like the Turing complete user. I can't quite decide if Lialina's penchant for animated gifs is charming or obnoxious, though.
  • Mark Rosenfelder's Metaverse (2013-08-13) : This is the home of the Language Construction Kit (LCK), an awesome resource for scifi/fantasy authors that is also available in an expanded paper or ebook edition. There is considerably more to Rosenfelder's site than this, including original fiction and essays.
  • Lorem Ipsum (2012-08-15) : For anyone who has needed dummy text to fill in a web or text layout for testing and presentation, this is your go to site. Besides the dummy text generator, it describes the origins of the dummy text itself in a treatise by Cicero.
  • The Official M.C. Escher Website (2012-03-01) : A fabulous place to have a good look at an incredible amount of Escher's ouvre, especially if you need to find the name of a familiar piece. The scans are typically of a sensible size both in terms of loading time and detail.
  • Inquiries By Herodotus (2012-02-14) : A new on-line translation of Herodotus, including up to date photographs, photographic tours, and maps. The creating group is "Lost Trails", made up of photographers and several translators collaborating on archaeology-themed projects.
  • Boston Globe: Russia In Color (2011-12-31) : I don't spend time on mainstream sites often, but here is a happy exception. This page presents colour photographs from 1909-12 Russia. How is that possible? Have a look! (If the site seems to keep loading even after the photos are all visible, you can safely hit the "stop" button.)
  • Archimedes Palimpsest (2010-10-23) : a place to learn all about two formerly lost books written by the ancient Greek scientist Archimedes, The Method and The Stomachion. You can read transcriptions of the text or read from photographs of the original palimpsest filtered to make the older text visible.
  • Cool Tools (2009-04-21) : there are few places where you can find information on useful products, ideas, or tools with trustworthy reviews by people who have used them. Cool Tools is one of those rare sites, featuring items ranging from bluntly practical (wheelbarrow handle extensions for the very tall) to quirky and unusual (Little Nemo in Slumberland). 2016-06-26 UPDATE: Cool Tools has been through some unfortunate changes resulting in one of the ugliest layouts I've ever seen and a tragic drop in real content and attendant rise in advertising. It may take awhile for me to find a good alternative.
  • Apple Pro Tips Archive (2009-01-11) : once upon a time, it was possible to get MacWorld Mac Secrets Mac Bibles books. They were huge, experienced-users-oriented tomes that were acutely useful. Alas, they have vanished at least for the moment, due to the many people switching to Macintosh computers. The books labelled "Mac-bibles" right now have an unfortunate tendency to insist that readers need a lecture on how to use the mouse and drop down menus. Until the real thing is back, this site is a decent stand-in.
  • Hyperphysics (2008-11-16) : one of the many marvelous educational websites that began as a hypercard stack. It is in effect a non-linear physics textbook, including extensive examples and calculations. As a physics graduate, I have a favourite problem; check out how to calculate whether you could fall through the Earth.
Copyright © C. Osborne 2017
Last Modified: Sunday, April 2, 2017 2:20:36