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[This is kluge.]Where some ideas are stranger than others...

AMAZONS at the Moonspeaker

The Moonspeaker:
Where Some Ideas Are Stranger Than Others...

PART TWO: GODDESSES OF THE AMAZON NATION

Described here in as much detail as possible are the few Goddesses of the Amazons remaining in literature today. First and foremost is Artemis, the main Goddess of the Thermodontine Amazons. This reflects the bias of the material, which comes from after the Libyan Amazons had apparently disappeared, and their main Goddesses had been nearly forgotten or recast. The works attributed to the Goddesses reflect what their worshippers did, just as their titles and legends show what was considered sacred and valuable. Therefore a great deal of Amazon culture can be seen in the details described here.

These Goddesses were chosen solely on the basis of their association with the Amazons, yet curiously an alliance between these four Goddesses: Artemis, Athena, Aphrodite, and Hera appears in Greek mythology. Together they stand fundamentally opposed to the new patriarchal world order. Their opposition, mirrored by the resistance of Amazons and other matrilineal tribes that worshipped them in the face of intense persecution, is recorded in the tale of Harmothoe's daughters.

Harmothoe was a queen of Thrake who had three daughters, Kamiro, Klytie, and Aedon... or Kleothera, Chelidon, and Merope. In either case, these names correspond to pre-Hellenic Goddesses. Orphaned by the cruelty of Zeus and adopted by Aphrodite, they were brought up in her ocean palace near Kyprus. There they were instructed in philosophy, science, and mathematics by Athena, leadership and poise by Hera, and in hunting, woodcraft and sports by Artemis. They grew into powerful women, coveted by a variety of petty Greek kings. Ultimately they 'went mad and became Maenads.' That is they opted out of Greek society and lived as Amazons in the mountains of Arkadia.

Copyright © C. Osborne 2017
Last Modified: Sunday, November 25, 2012 20:17:21 MDT